The Button Camera, Back Alleys, and French Multiculturalism

A deserted street in "No-Go Zone" in Paris.

I was holding my small HD camcorder, nearly hidden across the street. I could see through the open door of the Halal butcher shop. It was a busy day in this north Paris suburb, and a nearby Arab market was in full swing. Men were bringing in slabs of red meat from a white box truck, cutting it in long pieces, and hanging it on strings for purchase. As I looked through my viewfinder a hallowed face slowly drifted into frame, his eyes looking straight down my lens.

It took me a second to realize that I had been caught. Holding up a big butcher knife to the camera, another man walked by and shut the side door. This was no normal butcher shop–this was controlled by the Muslim Brotherhood, a group with thick historical ties to Islamic extremism. Continue reading

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Jim Cantore, Hurricane Earl, and the Storm Waiting Bug

 

Efrem Graham does a news stand up in the Outer Banks the morning after Hurricane Earl rolls through.

 

I’ve never been in a hurricane before. The closest I’ve been to experiencing one was last year this time while covering a tropical storm that formed over Virginia Beach. We dealt with flooded homes, stranded cars, downed power lines, that sort of thing. I remember in amazement the water level at my door step, watching it slosh up and over the curb. I remember barely getting to work in my gray Sonata, worried that the flooded streets would hurt my engine. Going into Hurricane Earl I didn’t know what to expect. That was a tropical storm, this was a hurricane.

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The Redshirt Champion

Coach K watches over his players during a pre-game practice.

Gordon Hayward was crying on the back of a golf cart behind the stadium. They were about to drive him to a private CBS studio for a post game interview. I was holding a steady close up of the kid’s face: red, tired, and beaten. He had just lost the championship. Continue reading

The woman who was a clown…

It started with skipping dinner.

View from my hotel room in San Diego.

I was in a hotel in San Diego, a big Hilton just off of San Diego Bay. I had skipped dinner after a long day of shooting news stories for CBN. And instead of grabbing dinner out–I stayed in. This turned out to be an error. At around 9:30 my stomach told me otherwise. Thus began a spark that would end with meeting the clown lady…

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Pottery Barn and Earthquakes

***UPDATE AT BOTTOM, ADDED 2/1/2010***

I hope you’ve taken some time to look at the photos coming out of Haiti. Look into the eyes of angry and lost people. Not to be dramatic, but I think its important to acknowledge the hurting people of Haiti, mainly those in Port-au-Prince. This kind of hurt demands an international response of compassion, patience, and support. Continue reading

Rifqa Bary, the apostate child…

UPDATED ON 18 OCT. 2009

Rifqa Bary: threatened child, or hormonal wolf crier?

I’ve had the opportunity to travel the US and track this story. After shooting interviews, talking to her friends, and hearing both sides of the argument I’ve come to a few interesting, personal “observations.” A story interesting to Christians and Muslims alike, both sides loudly weighing in with their opinions. What are these opinions? Why is it a fascinating story that strikes the hearts of American Muslims? And why is this one small, teenage girl causing all this commotion? Let’s lay out the details…

It’s late July in Columbus Ohio, and Rifqa Bary, not unlike other girls her age, is having a quarrel with her parents. But unlike most of those other girls, Rifqa Bary is Muslim-raised and from Sri Lanka. And she’s arguing with her parents about Christianity… Continue reading